Why do musicians like the Feldenkrais Method?

Why do musicians like the Feldenkrais Method?

By Aliza Stewart, GCFP

The Feldenkrais Method supplies musicians with the missing links that allow them to make the leap from good playing to remarkable playing. These missing links are self-awareness and effective movement patterns at the instrument.

Dr Feldenkrais said that in order to do what you want to do physically, you have to understand what you’re already doing that gets in the way. He developed movement “lessons” which shine light and potency into the “blind spots” of our self-understanding. These gentle but enormously effective lessons, create new neural pathways to make everything easier. They help musicians take the pain, effort and sense of limitation out of making music.

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Making Music in the Field of Gravity: Playing efficiently while achieving your Musical goals

Making Music in the Field of Gravity: Playing efficiently while achieving your Musical goals

Musical performance begins with a musical intention, which is translated into a series of movements involving weight, speed, orientation in space, and relationship to gravity. For the music to soar freely, without causing injuries, you, the musician, need to experience the joy of efficient, elegant movement in gravity. This experience will not only protect you from injuries, it will inform and influence your phrasing, your rhythm, and your palette of sound.

Properties of sound – time, space, weight, rhythmical impulse, gesture, momentum towards an action (a leap against gravity), process of speeding gradually and slowing down gradually – are all properties of movement. When, for a musician, these properties are not experienced in their movement, two things happen – the brain does not have the appropriate image of the action needed for the musical gesture, and it cannot send the right impulses to the muscles. The action is then clumsy and can result in injuries.

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Why I’m moved by Feldenkrais for musicians

When my friend and colleague Buffy Owens of ConsciousMovements.com asked me if I’d contribute to her new project, I began to prepare myself to resist the temptation and offer my regrets. After all, there are only so many good projects I can work on at any given time. But once I found out that the theme was “how Feldenkrais moves me” I knew I had to say yes. Here’s the result of our collaboration – just under 90 seconds on why and how I am moved to practice and teach Feldenkrais for musicians. Words and music by me, technical, visuals,…

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What’s your musical kung fu? 7 lessons for musicians from the martial arts

What’s your musical kung fu? 7 lessons for musicians from the martial arts

It is said that when two martial artists of different traditions fight, the winner does not prove the superiority of his martial art, but merely the superiority of his own kung fu, or fighting ability.

Similarly, when you are on stage, the audience doesn’t care what degrees you have, who you studied with, how many hours you practice a day, or even how good your chops are. Your audience wants to be moved. They want to feel a connection with you and with the music you are presenting. How well you do reflects your ‘musical kung fu’ – your ability to perform and convey the music behind the notes.

As it turns out, we musicians have much in common with martial artists. My own vocal and instrumental technique is full of lessons I learned in my years studying tai chi, not to mention the lessons I’ve learned from the Feldenkrais Method. And did you know Moshe Feldenkrais was a Judo master? In fact, much of the method is based on Judo.

Here are just a few concepts martial artists and musicians have in common, as well as some lessons certain martial arts have to teach musicians…

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What’s holding you back?

What’s holding you back?

I believe we become musicians because of a vision we have of what we could do – of the music we could make. We might have fallen in love with the sound of the instrument as played by a teacher or on a recording, or we might have been drawn to the simple idea of being a musician. This vision, whatever it is, sustains us through those difficult first steps of learning to make a sound – any sound at all at first, and then a (let’s face it) tolerable sound, and eventually, we hope, a sound which we find satisfying. As we master our art, our sense of what’s possible evolves, the vision evolves, and we can always see a ‘next step’ for our skill.

What’s preventing you right now from realizing your vision?
What’s preventing you from reaching your next step?

Injury? Tension? Posture? Anxiety? A lack of flow and ease?
Lack of inspiration, of connection to the vision, to the music itself?

All of these impediments to your art are bound up in your most basic habitual movement patterns: from the habits you use to hold yourself up and move around, to those you use to interact with other people, to the very patterns you use to make music….

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New directions, new adventures

New directions, new adventures

Last spring, in a blog post on “the risks of freedom,” I wrote of the challenges and rewards of leaving behind the tried-and-true and moving beyond the limitations of our own self-image. I hinted at the time rather broadly that I would be taking some risks with my professional self image, and that you should expect some changes in the sorts of programs I offer. Well, it’s taking somewhat longer than I expected, but the pieces are finally (I hope!) coming together. In January, I took a big step outside my comfort zone by letting go of what had been…

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A Dynamic Look at Sitting Posture

A Dynamic Look at Sitting Posture

One of the most frequent requests I get in my private Functional Integration® lessons is for help with sitting. My students tell me they have trouble finding a comfortable position to sit in, or that they can’t make it through a work day or meditation session without discomfort. They have lower back pain or RSI, hand pain, tight neck and shoulders… you get the idea. We all sit a lot, and we all face these challenges.

“I know I have terrible posture,” they often say. Or else “I try to sit up straight, but I get tired,” or “I keep reminding myself to sit up, but the next time I check, I’m slouching again.” Often their idea of “good posture” is to stiffly pull the shoulders back and tighten their belly, which is usually counter-productive.

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The High Holidays embody the spiritual significance of Awareness Through Movement. Or is it the other way around?

The High Holidays embody the spiritual significance of Awareness Through Movement. Or is it the other way around?

If you’re Jewish, and you take the High Holidays seriously, you might have had the experience that, as the Days of Awe progress, you’re just beginning to touch something, just beginning to see and feel your life for what it really is, just beginning to realize what it is that you need to do to really turn over a new leaf in the new year… and… then it’s all over. the final shofar blows, and … you feel lighter! The Holidays have worked their magic once again.

But what of that glimpse? What was that possibility of redemption? Of transformation? Of some fundamental shift in your relationship to the way you inhabit your life?

And what does this have to do with Awareness Through Movement?

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What’s the right way to breathe? A different take on breathing exercises

What’s the right way to breathe? A different take on breathing exercises

What’s the best way to breathe?

Through the mouth or through the nose?

More in the belly, or more in the chest?

It it always better to breath deeply?

Some techniques teach the expansion of the abdomen as you breathe in, others as you breathe out. Which is better?

Here is what Moshe Feldenkrais had to say about the right way to breathe:

“I am generally against breathing exercises in the commonly accepted notion of breathing exercises…”

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My Summers in New Hampshire

My Summers in New Hampshire

Every summer now for over a decade I have had the great pleasure and honor of spending a few weeks teaching Feldenkrais at the beautiful World Fellowship Center at the foot of the White Mountains near Conway, New Hampshire.
I spend the first half of my stay teaching, coaching, and performing at the Early Music Week, and the other half teaching a four-day intensive Awareness Through Movement retreat.

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